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Acceptable CPE Signal levels
#1
Hello Guys,

I'm looking to find out what kind of signal level ranges you look for when qualifying new CPE connections to your PtMP APs. For both 2.4 g only and 5.8

I'm used to 5.8 SNR ranges and not db.
All of my reference to db levels are from using 2.4 gig hoppers where I would look to get -60s to -70s trying to keep everyone below a -82 or so.

Does this apply to both 2.4 G only and 5.8 with StarOS as well?
Am I being silly not to allow B connections?
As I see it, it's new StarOS only APs anc CPE so I want to keep it optimized the best I can.


Thanks,
Kevin
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#2
For all StarOS CPE's, best is 11g only (or 11a) with x2 cloaking.

Keep signals better then -75, and worse then -60, but minimum for a connection is -83 for all 1.3.x units. That goes for both 2.4 and 5.8, since radio's are the same, and work the same.
Ljubomir Ljubojevic - Love is in the Air
Google is the Mother, Google is the Father, and traceroute is your trusty Spiderman...
StarOS and CentOS/RHEL/Linux consultant
Powerful Starv3 manipulation tool - StarV3 Multipractik for Linux
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#3
Hi Doc, and special K
Looks like a -73 will yield a 54 M throughput on A and G mode.
It only takes a -90 to get the full 11 M in B mode
Here is the Compex spec sheet that shows what to expect

http://static.zoovy.com/merchant/pnt/WLM54G-23.pdf


You might want to explain your thoughts of "minimum for a connection is -83 for all 1.3.x units"
I am kind of curious about that statement.
Dave
<
@)
(Cooter>>
^^^^^^^^^^
Vrablic

"I have no excuses, Just reasons"

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#4
Around -80 to -85 is about where performance generally starts to get very poor in the real world, despite the spec sheets. We try not to do any installs that are worse than -80.
StarOS Community Wiki: http://staros.tog.net/
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#5
Hi Tog, I aim for -70 to -60 to stay out of trouble. I start turning down the power after that unless there is some special condition to work around.

I was just wondering about the specific reference to the 1.3.x firmware.
Thinking maybe there was some threshold in that version that did something I wasn't aware of.
If it is just a general " rule of thumb" statement it would apply to most all versions. I suspect that to be the case.
Dave
<
@)
(Cooter>>
^^^^^^^^^^
Vrablic

"I have no excuses, Just reasons"

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#6
-80 is our cut off point, if its worse than -80 we do not connect the client, its not worth it, if these is a small problem in the area the client will be a pain calling you all the time.

After saying that, I have one client way out in the sticks at -88 on 2.4 without any problems and one client on 5.8 at -86 again without a problem, but -80 is my cut off point these 2 clients were installed in the early days and I keep meaning to call out to them and do somthing to give them a better signal..
The box said "Requires Windows XP or better"........................ So I installed LINUX.....
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#7
David L. Vrablic Wrote:I was just wondering about the specific reference to the 1.3.x firmware.
Thinking maybe there was some threshold in that version that did something I wasn't aware of.

When 1.3.x came out, dev guys said, and many forum posters confirmed that old driver used to reliably work until -75 to -78, and that new driver (in 1.3.x) is capable of better using poor signals, and that usable signal is now around -83. Everything poorer than that can be troublesome.

I do not remember what exact version number introduced that improvement, it could be 1.3.0, or some later 1.3.x version, changelog could answer on that question.
Ljubomir Ljubojevic - Love is in the Air
Google is the Mother, Google is the Father, and traceroute is your trusty Spiderman...
StarOS and CentOS/RHEL/Linux consultant
Powerful Starv3 manipulation tool - StarV3 Multipractik for Linux
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#8
I have found that 5 ghz clients need to have at least -75 and prefer better.

11b staros clients that are not subject to a lot of noise (physically isolated) will work great up to around -86 or so. -90 will do 11 once in a while, but often sits at 2 or 5.5 for speed, and rarely stays at 100 quality.

11b clients at -80 or even -81 will generally be able to suck up 900 1200 KB using the staros speed test.

If you want to do 11g, it seems to work fine for short distances and when you're above -75 or so, even better if you can get better than -70.
====================================
mark at neofast dot net
An all-star-os-all-the-time WISP
5 out of 4 people have trouble with math.
====================================
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#9
Mark Wrote:I have found that 5 ghz clients need to have at least -75 and prefer better.

My office link is 5.8GHz, currently -79, been -83 and worked on rate 9-12Mbit without any problems. Noise -92
Ljubomir Ljubojevic - Love is in the Air
Google is the Mother, Google is the Father, and traceroute is your trusty Spiderman...
StarOS and CentOS/RHEL/Linux consultant
Powerful Starv3 manipulation tool - StarV3 Multipractik for Linux
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#10
You can run the 5 ghz clients there, probably without issues, but it seriously saps the throughput capability of the AP.

In other words.... My 2.4 11b ap's can serve right at 30 clients. No more, for sure, and RSSI at just 85 is not a problem at all.

If you keep the RSSI levels up on a 5 ghz AP, you can easily run about 50 to 60 clients. Let some clients fall into the mid 80's or even worse, and the throughput from the AP sinks into the toilet when those low RSSI clients get busy.
====================================
mark at neofast dot net
An all-star-os-all-the-time WISP
5 out of 4 people have trouble with math.
====================================
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